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Intent vs Impact

This lesson challenges participants to consider how a mismatch between intent and impact can cause conflict and develop strategies for mitigating problems. They will first learn the differences between intent and impact and then find real-world examples where intent and impact did not match. 

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Unintentional Harm

This lesson will challenges participants to think more deeply about scenarios that cause unintentional harm. They will first identify several situations where they have either experienced or caused unintentional harm. Then, they will place those scenarios on a Jamboard shared with several group members and reflect on how they felt and how they might have handled the situation differently. 

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Emic Perspective

This lesson presents the concepts of etic (outsider/objective) and emic (insider/subjective) understanding of culture. The slides explain the differences in these two perspectives, offer motivation for developing emic perspectives by discussing the value of this viewpoint, list some strategies for learning to see a culture from the insider viewpoint, and use concrete (published) case study examples as fodder for practice and instruction. 

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Analysis of an Intercultural Interaction

In this lesson plan, participants describe an intercultural interaction. Participants choose an interaction in which they took part, as this will be more beneficial for them in terms of self-awareness. The interaction participants choose should have involved some confusion, misunderstanding, conflict, or offense of some sort, on their part or on the part of others involved, and which may or may not have been resolved. Participants identify who was involved, where they were and under what circumstances, what was said or not said, and what happened. 

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Connect Your Cultural Dots

This lesson challenges participants to think more deeply about how culture contributes to everyday norms/behaviors and habits. With a partner, they will choose several cards from two sets: cultural contexts and behaviors/norms. Then, they will talk through their life experiences and attempt to “connect the dots” between how their cultural contexts have affected their behaviors/norms in particular scenarios. Finally, they will complete a debriefing reflection on what they learned about themselves and their partner.

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Thick Description Observation

This lesson challenges participants to practice thick description and dig deeper into how culture impacts how people design and use physical spaces. They will choose a space to observe and then write a thick description essay based on the notes that they take.

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Turning the Tables

This activity asks participants to create their own retelling of a popular movie, comic, novel, or historical event and reflect on their experience of shifting perspectives.

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Comfort with Discomfort

This lesson asks participants to reflect on their emotions and practice managing them during interactions that may be tense or uncomfortable. They can choose either to talk with a family member or close friend with whom they disagree on a deeply-held value/belief or to attend an event in which their social identity is minoritized. Either way, they will reflect on their emotions before, during, and after the conversation/event and consider how they might more strategically manage their emotions for future difficult encounters.

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Communication Pacing in "Among Us"

In this activity, participants will play Among Us, an online multiplayer (4-10) social deduction game where individuals are categorized as either crewmate or imposter. Each round everyone either completes tasks or, as an imposter, they must kill the other crewmates without being discovered. When a body is discovered, or someone calls an emergency meeting, everyone has to explain what they were doing, and the imposter must lie and protect their identity. Players of the game are quickly aware of the other players’ various communication styles and often have to adapt a different style to successfully play the game. For example, will they be quieter when everyone converses to hide their deeds? Do they tend to talk over individuals to demonstrate their innocence? Are the pauses between their sentences something to be suspicious of?

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